Finding the Yin-Yang balance in relationships

Be it romantic, friendship, family or business, relationships are a cornerstone of the human experience. We are all made up of male and female energies, described in the East as Yin and Yang. We reached out to Faye Fitzgerald, founder of the Training in Power™ Academy to chat about how we can better understand Yin and Yang to bring more health into our relationships.

yin-yang

The Eastern concept of Yin and Yang is a well-known method of explaining the two opposing energies in nature and in ourselves. It is often used to describe the unifying or polarizing forces of female and male energy. What is your perspective of these two energies?

Yin is of the non-matter position or spirit frequency and the Yang is the matter position. This includes the bio-matter, which is your own physicality. So you are always both.

We have the symbol of Yin and Yang: Yin is dark because it encompasses the unseen portion of things. Consider the Buddha who described our thoughts as being ‘subtle matter’. This unseen portion is the area of will, which forces our existence to produce or manifest.

This concept of Yin and Yang can easily be applied when dealing with relationships. This includes a male-female dynamic as well as same-sex relationships. The ultimate goal is to find a energy balance between the two individuals.

Sometimes when you have a partner who is only on the Yang, then you’ll have them coupled with someone who is only on the Yin. A classic picture might be a huge, loud guy and she will be small, quiet female. He just finds her lovely and everything she wants to do is just fine by him because she’s Yin and he’ll never understand her because he’s so Yang.

You have counselled many couples and have developed 2 ground breaking relationship courses. What has been some of the key observations you made with how Yin and Yang plays out in relationships?

Every person is a mixture of both energies, but when you have two predominantly Yang people together it can be dramatic and often stressful. That’s because they are butting heads and they act everything out on the external level. For example, a Yang man would be wise to not compete with a Yang woman, but rather give her room to pursue her ambition. She in turn would benefit from not being overbearing or controlling with him. The best position for the Yang dominant relationship is if they join forces and support each other in their respective intensity.

On the other extreme, you can get two Yins together too. That is interesting, because they are both full of ideas, but they keep waiting for the other to take the action. If they don’t take action they will lose respect for each other and it can build resentment between them. If they decide to work together on a creative project and go into action-mode, they are often very sensitive in their approach and can be very successful.

What are some classic archetypes that you feel describe a healthy Yin and Yang placement?

Apollo and Artemis, by Gavin Hamilton (c) Glasgow Museums; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
Apollo and Artemis, by Gavin Hamilton (c) Glasgow Museums; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

I think Apollo is a wonderful Yang archetype. He shines the sun and brings fertility and love. He is the beauty of the creative male who understands himself and doesn’t need to berate or belittle anyone to be strong. He is the Yang who comprehends his aggression is for protection, not to harm the beings he supposedly loves.

I would choose Diana, the Goddess of the moon for a healthy archetypical Yin. She is known as Artemis in Greek mythology. She is the huntress and a warrior. She is independent and connected to the mysteries of the universe. Her internal motivation creates a sense of trust and self-sufficiency, so she is not at risk of submitting or buckling to anyone else.

How would you then describe a healthy relationship dynamic?

I would describe it as mannerly, polite and formal. This means being mutually supportive and willing to divide areas of strength and cover areas of weakness. The 100% required for a relationship is required from each party. If you’re only willing to give 60% that leaves 140% on the shoulders of the other partner and there will be a gap. When there is a gap, it tends to widen as time goes on. You can’t owe, otherwise you’ll have resentment and cheating, so it’s best if both parties find a way to give equally to the relationship.

How do you counsel people to get in touch with their Yin and Yang in a healthy way?

An imbalance of Yin and Yang will often show up as the need to control. If people are over controlling on the external, chances are they feel out of control on the internal. The Yang controller will focus on a need for dominance and their behaviour will be visibly dominating.

In contrast, the Yin controller is the one who will “tsk tsk” under the breath. They will give you approval only when they get what they want and there is a passive aggressive dynamic rather than the aggressive of the Yang.

On either side of the spectrum, they’ve got to move out of their fear and find the courage to go inwards. That is a lot of what we teach in our training – the journey inward – where all the answers really are for your life. Of course, if you are busy having all the answers for everybody else’s life, you might be missing out on a couple of things on your own. You’ve got to be conscious, which is what we try to offer our students, a clear path to that conscious living.

Faye Fitzgerald is the founder of the Training in Power Academy, a spiritual education system that offers over 20 courses in meditation, spiritual healing and self-empowerment. She has been teaching and counselling people to their spiritual wellness for over thirty years. Find out more at www.fayefitzgerald.com

 

 

 

 

 

A new world vision: School replaces detention with meditation

A Baltimore elementary school has been getting a lot of praise and web-traction lately for their use of meditation instead of detention. For the past year, children are sent to the “mindful moment room”, when they have misbehaved or need to wind down. Here they are coached to breathe and reflect on their feelings and actions. The school has also integrated Yoga into their holistic program and as a result of their new approach, there have been no suspensions in over a year.

 

This news led me to reflect, how would have things been different for me if I had been given this knowledge as a child? What if punishment was replaced with an opportunity for self empowerment?

While I was generally a well-behaved student, I was a very sensitive and high strung child. I dreaded going to school most days. I had a hard time sitting still in class. Eventually, my mother sent me to school with a “doodle book” every day to keep my hands busy, where I would scribble and draw while the teacher spoke. This habit followed me all the way until university, until I learned to meditate.

As I learned to be comfortable in my body, present in the moment and focus from a greater part of my mind, the need for constant distraction disappeared. That’s not to say I stopped drawing, this was a constructive outlet that eventually enriched my creative life, but I stopped needing it as a coping mechanism.

In many ways, I believe children are naturally built for meditation. Although most kids are busy and sometimes frenetic, if you watch them when they becoming engaged play and imagination, the same kind of focus is engaged as we use in meditation. Clinical psychologist Dr Lee Pulos has done extensive research on brainwave patterns and has proven that young children live primarily in the Theta and Alpha brainwave patterns, until they are adults when they move more into the logic-based Beta pattern. These Theta and Alpha patterns are the same states that artists, well-practiced yogis and practitioners of meditation achieve in their practice.

If we can catch children early on and give them the scientifically proven benefits of meditation, then imagine what kind of foundation of emotional health, inner wisdom and personal strength they could develop! If we did this as a society, what kind of world might we build? Something to meditate about, no doubt.

Read the full article about the Robert W. Coleman Elementary school here.

Resistance: Know your Enemy!

IMG_4382_resized_enhColor

Waboom! The epiphany descends, a glorious new creative idea. In a Technicolor flash I see the spectrum of my next great screenplay, sure to be success, the best I’ve ever done. I scribble down the first few lines and resume my day, satisfied I’m still on track towards my dream of becoming a filmmaker of fame and fortune. Then, as usual, life gets busy. A few days pass, I keep telling myself I’ll wait for the right moment to sit down with the project, to devote some real time to developing it. A week passes and then another, I start to doubt that the idea is even worth it. A month later, I find the scribbled page of my notebook with the original flash. Damn, this is an awesome idea. I’d been had, and it wasn’t the first or the last time…

“Most of us have two lives. The life we live and the unlived life within us. Between the two stands resistance”.

Stephen Pressfield, The War of Art

You’re too tired, too busy, too distracted. The idea is so good that you need to just do one more thing before you really really start. It’s too noisy outside, you’re suddenly hungry, the fridge really needs to be cleaned and oh wait, your pants are too tight.

Sound familiar? These are all symptoms of resistance, and you are wise to get to know your foe before it totally derails you from ever knowing the feeling of realizing your potential.

Resistance is an unconscious mechanism that will do anything to stop us from achieving our evolution, be it spiritual, creative or making our mark on the world. Stephen Pressfield’s creative handbook, “The War of Art” goes into great depth of exploring where and how this nemesis plays out. He describes creativity as a war, and as his 5th century predecessor, military strategist Sun Tzu states in “the Art of War”, it is always wise to both know your enemy and yourself before going into battle.

The Many Faces of Resistance

Remember, Resistance is unconscious. Would we stop ourselves from achieving our true potential? Nevertheless it is a worthy opponent and is often fueled by our underlying fears. The antidote? Do it anyway! Call the job lead, go to the event, take the singing lessons. No one is immune to resistance; those who succeed in achieving their goals have often built the strength to forge ahead, to know the many faces of their enemy.

Procrastination, self­doubt, fatigue, drama (getting pulled into yours or others) are all familiar tropes of resistance. It can get tricky sometimes, like when resistance often tells you that it would be easier NOT to do the task at hand, which is probably true. But is life most satisfying when it is easy? Do we grow and thrive when everything is a mouse click away?

And how about when reality doesn’t behave? You finally psych yourself up to go to the gym and a massive rainstorm comes down as you go to catch the bus. Or your computer crashes when you sit down to write the first draft of your book. Is this the universe giving you a sign that it’s not meant to be, or is it resistance? The answer: Get wet and start your first draft on paper. i.e. Do it anyway and see how good you feel on the other side!!

Get Smart

We all have our weak areas that the opponent will seek out. Get to know how resistance shows up for you and what it feels like when you are in it. I know that resistance comes in as fatigue and even physical pain for me. My strategy: take little bites everyday. I won’t let resistance take a day of writing from me, even if it’s just 20 minutes at a time. And if I miss one, I am more ruthless to make up the time the next day. Know your blind spots and make a plan. I had a friend who was always late for her meditation classes. Her approach? Leave an hour earlier.

Ultimately consider Pressfield’s suggestion to “use it as a compass.” When resistance shows up, it means you’re onto something really good. If it persists, you are really going strong! As you continue to build up your ability to face it and conquer its temptation, the more you will be able to feel your Genius and follow her guidance.

For more tips on living spiritually strong, check my post The 5 keys of the Spiritual Warrior.

Elinor Svoboda

~Level 1 and 2 teacher

 

 

Reflections on Being Highly Sensitive

I recently read an article on the Quiet Revolution website that prompted a cascade of reflection on my own highly sensitive nature. It brought up a lot of emotion as I recalled various experiences in my childhood.

For instance, I have a vivid memory of my first day at Kindergarten. I cried in the cloak room for hours, terrified to go into the classroom. My mum left me thinking I would adjust better on my own. The noise from the classroom froze me to the bench. Sometime after the first break, someone coaxed me into the classroom. I stayed by the door beside the wall for what seemed like a very long time before joining the story circle. I liked the story but I was utterly uncomfortable with all those other kids so close, all talking and smelling and invading my personal space.

sensitive

I’ve always been affected by things that others didn’t even seem to notice. I was often overwhelmed emotionally. The noisier the environment, the harder it was for me. And I learned to interpret all this as meaning there was something wrong with me. And too often to count, I was instructed by my parents to be other than I am – “don’t be shy”, “be more assertive”, “you should have more friends”, “you just need more practice”. The end result was dozens of coping mechanisms including many ways to hide in plain sight. Once I was an adult, I would joke about being the canary in the coal mine. Except it was no joke.

As an adult, I’ve done a lot of personal work. For years I searched for ways to accept myself as I am. I tried many systems and methodologies, both ancient and modern. Until I found Level 1, I searched all the time. Then I was gifted with these beautiful energy tools and everything changed. It wasn’t like flipping a switch and all was perfect. It was more like someone showed me where the switch was so I could learn how to use it. The more I practiced the active meditation techniques and used my energy shielding system, the more I was able to move toward that self acceptance I was seeking. I learned to build my focus enough to protect myself without completely shutting off from the world. I could see the proverbial light at the end of the tunnel.

Now I see my experience in Kindergarten for what it was – the strong reaction of a highly sensitive child thrown into a noisy, crowded, strange smelling and bright environment without any boundaries or ability to protect myself. My mum tells the story quite differently – but then how could she know what it was really like for me? I wonder how my life would have been different if my mum and dad had recognized me as highly sensitive. What if they had accepted me as I am and provided me with more understanding and support?  I realize I wouldn’t be the same person I’ve evolved into if I had not had those experiences. More importantly, I can now give to myself that understanding, acceptance and support.

So when I read the article that prompted all this reflection, the words spoke directly to my heart.  Daisy Gumin, the author, has graciously permitted me to repost her words here. I share this in the hope that it will speak to you too. And I invite you to remember that each of us, no matter where we fall on the spectrum of sensitivity, has the right to be loved for who we are. Thank you Daisy for sharing.

~ Nancy Marsh, Level I Teacher

This article first appeared on January 23, 2016 on Quietrev.com

Advice for Parents of Highly Sensitive Children

By Daisy Gumin

Dear Parents of Highly Sensitive Children,

There is nothing wrong with your child. Both you and your child need to know that— really know that. Below are the six things I think a highly sensitive child might need from you the most.

1) Love us for who we are.

We actually feel things more deeply than most of the population. High sensitivity is a biological trait, not a choice.

Don’t assume that we’re just like you and that what worked for you will work for us. We can’t control how deeply we feel. We can’t decide when to stop feeling or which feelings not to have even when it appears as though we’ve got them under control.

When we try to suppress what makes us who we are, we risk losing the gifts that come with our temperaments.

Highly sensitive does not mean overly sensitive. What is normal, anyway? We know you want us to be happy, but trying to stop us from feeling badly is only a temporary solution. Where are all those feelings supposed to go?

If we’re fed the message that there’s an easier, better way to be, we’ll believe you and feel like something needs to be fixed. Help us embrace our “thin skin” and recognize that there’s nothing wrong with having it.

2) Listen to your intuition and not the “experts.”

Experts might tell you that we need therapy, or psychiatry, or that we’re bipolar, or have ADD, or need medication, or more medication. We are often misdiagnosed.

Consider that the experts may be wrong and that there’s nothing to cure. Experts are trained to psycho-pathologize. They look to label.

The experts we rely on to decipher our symptoms cannot possibly understand who we are in a one-hour consultation. See us with compassion, and then help us see what you see.

3) Teach us boundaries.                         

We are nurturers by nature.

We tend to the feelings of others while ignoring our own. We can give more than we have.

We need to hear that it’s okay to put ourselves first and that setting boundaries does not make us selfish.

4) School and group activities.

If we tell you we don’t want to go to school or to a group activity, try to find out why. Assume there is more to the story than what we’re telling you.

School is loud. Kids can be mean. They can betray, gossip, and exclude. School can be excruciatingly overstimulating. We are deeply affected by our surroundings and living in a culture that can be relentlessly aggressive.

Highly sensitive children sense the injustices and cruelties all around them. Trust that we must be experiencing something painful enough to ask you if we can stay home.

Consider that we may be the canaries in the coal mine.

5) Just listen.

Sometimes we don’t need advice, and we don’t need to hear why we shouldn’t feel the way we do. Sometimes, we just need you to listen.

6) Keep us close.

You are the North Star.

Letting Yourself Play Too

“Joys of the season to you and all you love!”

We do so much for others at this time of year, and for the outward displays of spirit. Whether celebrating the return of the sun, Christmas, Hanukkah, Diwali, or others, festivities and events call us to service. And sometimes, as adults, the little person inside the grown-up starts to act out. The office parties, holiday gatherings, gift shopping, all take energy and are fraught with expectations of ourselves and others, and something snaps.

I wacandles, festive, play, child withins volunteering at a community festival. I’d helped with set-up, the stringing of lights and banners, and at the event I was greeting people at a door, taking donations, giving directions. Yet eventually, I started to notice I wasn’t getting to participate in the fun part. Everybody was having fun, except Meee.

In earlier days, I would ruthlessly squelch that plaintive childish voice and keep on, smiling cheerfully and pretending it was alright, better to give than receive. But as a person of spirit, I need to take care of myself too. So I took a breath, checked in with the increasingly frantic tone of my inner self and realized she was right. It was time to take the help that was offered, let go of my self-appointed martyrdom and pass the torch to another person. So I asked, and another woman arrived at the post, and she was lovely, kind, smiling. I felt good leaving it in her hands.

As I remember this, I realize that she was showing me what I had contributed, all unknowing, to the event. Steadiness, good humor, unflappability. And now she could also bring those beautiful qualities to the world. And as I allowed myself to go and have fun, I will have that happy memory to add to all the reasons I volunteer here.

So, as you find and create the special places of light inside you and out in your world, remember that child inside of you. You also need to play, and it’s a different kind of sharing, to ask for help so you too can relax and join the fun. And then when you step back in to help, it will be even more a gift from the heart.

Sending wishes and light for joy and love, peace to the world and happiness to all that you are.

~ Lori Fuglem

Six Ways Meditation Can Make You a Better Writer

Ever since I printed my first letter “A” while watching Sesame Street as a toddler, I wanted to be a writer. I spent a good deal of my childhood and teens expressing my innermost thoughts and feelings through stories and poems. Once I reached a certain age, however, my yearning to write became more of a problem. According to my parents, it would get in the way of my earning a real living.

So, over the years, I tried to find a middle ground. I gave up fiction for a while and became a technical writer. It wasn’t until I learned to meditate, over a decade ago, that I realized I owed it to myself to pursue my dream. This article talks about how meditation made me a better writer, not a better writer than other people, but the best writer I can be.

1. Meditation allows me to get a different perspective: 
First of all, meditation is a spiritual practice that teaches us to seek within ourselves for guidance. When I meditate, I can get truly free of not only the perspectives of other people or what’s been done before. I can tune into my inner wisdom pull myself out of any problem. This different perspective really assists me in writing. I can use it to get to know my characters, to hear their voices. I can also use it to try to figure out how they would solve their own problems. If I get caught in a story idea, or character’s problem, I meditate until I find the answer. And I trust that the answers will come.
shutterstock_29703037
2. Meditation allows me to find inspiration: 
Similar to the way meditation allows for a different perspective, it’s also a wonderful way to attain creative insight and inspiration. I can tune into different worlds, allow myself to dream, and try out different story ideas until I find the one that calls me to write it. In fact, one of the courses I teach has an amazing tool for using your dreams or meditations to problem solve.

3. Meditation teaches me not to compare myself to others, to anyone else’s journey or achievements: 
One of the most difficult things for writers to do is not compare their successes (or challenges) with others. It’s so easy to get bogged down in other people’s opinions, or why one person is more successful than you are. When I meditate, however, I am reminded of the infinite abundance of spirit that connects us all. My spirit is working for me. My journey is different than other people’s but it’s perfectly tailored for my learning at this time. A friend once said to me, “Don’t give up your insides for someone else’s outsides.” I’ve come to realize that my life is a gift, just the way it is. And what other people have in their life does not matter. This is a discipline I’ve cultivated through a meditation practice.

4. Meditation keeps me humble, out of ego-first thinking: 
As with comparison, meditation allows me to see myself as I truly am: a spirit having a human experience. If I forget that, I can be led around by my ego, needing everyone to like me and my writing. It has been my finding that if I need anything from others, my neediness can push that very thing away. Ego can make us quite needy. It is only when I am humble, and out of ego, that I can open to my true potential.

5. Meditation assists me to move out of blocks – writer’s block or otherwise:
As part of my meditation practice, I have cultivated a life of truth. This means telling myself the truth, feeling my true feelings, and being willing to face my spirit no matter what. Every block I’ve experienced in my life stems around a feeling that I’m afraid to feel or a truth I’m afraid to face. The same is true of writer’s block. It’s simply another area where fear has me in its grip. I meditate to ask my spirit “what am I truly afraid of?” Once I face that fear, the block lifts.

6. Meditation gives me patience that sustains me when the path is long and arduous: 
Fulfilling any dream takes time, be it becoming an author or poet, or finishing medical school. There’s a discipline involved in studying and learning to get better at your chosen craft or profession. Meditation teaches me patience. It re-energizes and rejuvenates me to keep me focused on the long haul.

Though these are listed as six ways meditation has made me a better writer, truth is, I believe these lessons apply to any and all areas of life. If you have a particular meditation practice, keep up the good work!

Namaste!

~ Lisa Voisin,
Level 2 Teacher

Reprinted with thanks from Lisa’s blog,
https://lisavoisin.wordpress.com/2015/03/09/six-ways-meditation-can-make-you-a-better-writer/

Gluten-Free Sugar-Free Cake

This is a modified version of an old family recipe for Sicilian breakfast cake that I originally got from Georgia Colton. I’ve experimented with it a bit, and the chocolate is still my favourite.

Here’s the basic recipe first and then the modifications for the:

Infamous chocolate version

7 eggs
1 1/8 cup maple syrup
½ cup oil
1/3 cup water (or other liquid – cold coffee, juice, etc.)
3 ½ heaping tsp. baking powder
2 cups gluten-free flour (I prefer 80% amaranth, 20% buckwheat, or you could use rice, bean, or any commercial blend of gluten-free flour.  If using coconut flour, you’ll need to adjust the amounts of liquids and flour.)

  1. Separate the egg whites from yolks. Blend together the egg yolks, maple syrup, liquid and oil.
  2. In a separate bowl, beat egg whites until stiff.
  3. Fold one tablespoon egg whites into other liquid ingredients, then blend together.
  4. Add the rest of the egg whites to the liquid ingredients, and blend together, slowly adding the baking powder while blending.
  5. Fold/sift the flour into the mixture gradually, mixing with a whisk only until all flour lumps are gone.
  6. Pour into a buttered angel food cake pan, put into COLD oven, closing oven door gently.
  7. Turn oven to 300 degrees, and bake for one hour (use the standard fork/toothpick test)

cake_Lori F_blogOptions:

      • If you want to add flavouring, make the flavouring part of the liquid ingredients (e.g.: vanilla, lemon extract, coffee, etc.)
      • Add chopped nuts, fruit, poppy-seeds or chocolate chips while folding in flour.

For a deluxe triple chocolate mocha cake:

  • Substitute ½ Dutch Cocoa for flour in the flour mixture
  • Use cold espresso instead of water
  • Add about a half-cup of finely-shaved dark chocolate (the darker the better, preferably at least 70% cocoa, the less sugar the better).
  • Sprinkle a handful of dark chocolate chips over the mixture in the pan.

Because the chocolate is so rich, it may take an extra 10 minutes of baking time depending on oven, altitude, etc.

Enjoy!

~ Anna Melnikoff,
Teacher, Level 3

Chocolate to Meditate On

I’ve practiced meditation for many years and now I’m embarking on the process of training to teach it. I’m training to teach Level 1 – The Prophet. I’ve grown so much through my meditation practice and I want to help other people, the way I’ve been helped. I want to empower others to fully live their own life.

A few months back, I attended the Academy’s annual Teacher’s Conference. It’s an amazing gathering where I get the chance to explore my inner landscape, learn some tools and tips for teaching, and network with other teachers. Some of my colleagues have taught hundreds of people, some a dozen, and others are learning – like me.

One of my favourite parts of meeting and connecting with other teachers, is sharing my joy of food – in particular, chocolate, one of my favourite foods. Each year as I prepare for the Conference, I reminisce over the past year’s best chocolate experiences, and bring some of my favourites to share. I often bring my own chocolate bark– here’s the recipe:

Chocolate Bark

  • 700 g dark chocolate, brickchocolate
  • 200 g raw/roasted shelled pistachio seeds
  • 100 g dried mango, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 1 tsp cardamom seeds
  • 1 tsp coarse sea salt
  1. Chunk the chocolate brick, and melt in a double boiler over low heat, until melted, then take off the stove.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, then spread the cardamom seeds and dried mango randomly.
  3. Pour the melted chocolate over the cardamom and mango. Add the pistachios and sea salt to the top.
  4. Place in the fridge for half an hour, until solidified, then break up into pieces, and enjoy!

This year, I was excited to showcase one of my favourite local chocolate artists from here in Vancouver, Beta 5 Chocolates. Not only do they use my favourite chocolate base, from Michel Cluizel of France, they also create fascinating shaped Polygon Bars and incorporate fantastic flavours and colours. I tell everyone who will listen.

Another Canadian chocolate maker, Theobroma, based in Quebec, uses non-GMO ingredients, is gluten free, Fair Trade, and one of my perennial choices. When I want yum without having to think, Theobroma is one of my go-to chocolates.

You can tell I love chocolate. A bit of a connoisseur, really. Well I also love knowledge. A bit of a seeker, for sure. And as I shared chocolate experiences with my colleagues, and learned more about teaching and this amazing energy work that we do, I realized how much I appreciate this community of teachers who truly appreciate my unique gifts. So now as I prepare to teach, I find myself meditating often on chocolate.

~ Matthew Craig

Mercury Amalgam: Are Your Teeth Toxic?

Sweden and Denmark have banned its use entirely. Germany has imposed severe restrictions on its use, recommending that no amalgam restorations be placed in individuals with kidney disease, children, or any female of childbearing age, pregnant or not.

While the world’s largest manufacturer of dentistry metals has stopped producing amalgam, in North America, the American Dental Association (ADA) continues to approve mercury amalgam fillings.  It is still the most common dental material used in your teeth, with 75% of our population still implanted with mercury amalgam fillings.
tooth-294576_640
Dentists are taught that mercury is non-reactive when mixed with amalgam, yet scientific evidence has proven otherwise. Mercury is a potent neurotoxin that can damage your brain, central nervous system and kidneys.  Combining mercury with alloys and placing them in your mouth does not make mercury amalgam fillings harmless.  There is growing awareness that we are exposing ourselves to one of the most toxic metals known to science. As long as you have amalgam fillings in your mouth, you are breathing mercury vapors 24 hours a day.

Dentists are also taught stringent guidelines to handle mercury amalgam fillings as hazardous material before insertion in fillings and as toxic waste after removal. Yet, in an almost inconceivable twist of logic, they are told by the American/ Canadian Dental Association that amalgam fillings are considered safe when installed in the mouth.

On average an individual has 8 amalgam fillings and likely absorbs up to 120 micrograms of mercury per day.  With every bite of food or drink of a hot or cold beverage, these poisonous vapors are being released from the fillings and absorbed into cells, tissues, organs, and across the blood-brain barrier into your central nervous system and brain.

Mercury vapor when in the body converts itself to methyl-mercury (the organic form of mercury). Methyl-mercury easily crosses the blood-brain barrier, where it has been found to be instrumental in the onset of Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, and other neurological disorders. It is important to mention that as toxic as elemental mercury is, methyl-mercury is 100 times more toxic.  Naturally, the more amalgam fillings you have, the more you are putting your health at risk.

Symptoms of mercury poisoning may include:

  • chronic fatigue
  • food allergies
  • Candida
  • depression
  • asthma
  • numbness and tingling of extremities
  • muscle tremors
  • menstrual disorders
  • intestinal disorders
  • low back pain
  • blurred vision
  • even blindness.

teeth-295404_640The most readily available test for mercury toxicity is a hair analysis. A regular blood test is ineffective since mercury is quickly absorbed and stored in tissues, adrenals, thyroid, the brain and other organs. Once mercury toxicity is determined, a decision to remove the amalgams and have them replaced with porcelain or ceramic-resin composite restorations can be made. A gradual process is recommended to minimize the extent of mercury vapor and seepage into the body.

A dentist trained in the safe removal of mercury amalgam fillings is necessary and the consultation of a naturopathic physician is recommended, once the decision to remove amalgams has been made.

My own experience with mercury toxicity began with a diagnosis of M.S. in 1998. A hair analysis and 24 hour urine collection, after a DMPS injection (a mercury chelating agent), confirmed mercury toxicity. I then began an eight-month process of removing all 6 of my mercury amalgams by a “biological dentist”, trained in the safe removal of amalgam fillings. Under the observation of a naturopathic physician, I began a detoxification process using homeopathic remedies, DMPS injections, vitamin C injections, massage, etc. to assist the mercury in leaving my body, tissues, and organs. Many years later, my health continues to improve.

Thankfully, with scientific evidence mounting and growing awareness of the detrimental effects of mercury amalgam fillings, more and more people are beginning to take responsibility for their health and demanding alternatives.

~ Nancy Hall, R.H.N., Level X
More information:
Edlich, Richard F. [et al.] “Banning Mercury Amalgam.” 2010.
http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Adviso…e/DentalProductsPanel/UCM236379.pdf
Matsen, John. “U.S. Congress Bill to Ban Dental Mercury,” Jan. 2004.
http://www.northshorenaturopathicclinic.ca/january-2004-us-congress-bill-to-ban-dental-mercury/

Training in Active Receptivity

I was at a Qi Gong class with a friend and we learned a fun receptivity exercise. It’s designed to teach the difference between active and passive receptivity.

To do this exercise, you need a partner. The exercise consists of three parts: 1. Passive, 2. Active (Energized), and 3. Active Receptivity. As you practice each part, notice the energy and how it changes. Notice your hands and where you are storing any tension.

To begin, stand with your feet comfortably apart, facing your partner. You put your hands out in front of you, palms to the sky, elbows bent, as though you are about to catch something in your hands. Your hands remain palms up throughout the exercise.

Your partner puts their hands out, under your hands, with palms up and gently open. They lightly hold up your hands. There’s no force or exertion. Your partner’s hands are gentle, soft, and strong.

1. PassiveReceptivity Exercise_Fig1a
In this first position, make your hands passive, almost limp, with the palms still facing up. This is passive receptivity. Feel the energetics of this passivity. Your partner may notice that your hands feel heavy and difficult to hold up.

 

2. Active (Energized)
In this second position, you make your hands energized, spreading your fingers open wide and tense, like yoReceptivity Exercise_Fig2au’re trying to reach for something with only your fingers. Keep your arms steady and relaxed. Your partner continues to gently hold up your hands. Notice the energy of this. This is like the energetic of controlling, or “I can do it myself.” It is difficult to support your hands when they are tense and energized like this.

3. Active Receptivity
In this last position, you focus on being Actively ReceReceptivity Exercise_Fig3aptive. Your palms are open to receive. They are neither limp nor agitated: they are actively receiving. Your partner will find it easy to support your hands, because they are neither too tense, nor too limp. When I did this position, it was as though my hands were floating.

To finish the exercise, your partner gently guides your hands until your palms meet in the middle and then releases them.

Now repeat the whole exercise, changing positions so you are holding up your partner’s hands.

Each time I do this exercise, I’m reminded that trying too hard is as just as unrewarding as not trying at all. And in practicing this exercise, I am finding that holding the position of Active Receptivity is getting more natural.

~ Lisa Voisin, Level II Teacher
lisavoisin.com